A Centralised Knowledge Hub

By Patients & Caregivers for Patients & Caregivers

A Centralised Knowledge Hub
by Patients and Caregivers for Patients and Caregivers.

We give ‘Hope’ its first plan

A roadmap to best outcomes from day one.

EDUCATE – EQUIP – EMPOWER

Hi there,
We are here to help support your efforts in achieving the best possible outcomes.

Please ensure that you begin with the Patient Intro Kit, as you will need to form a basic information foundation before you proceed. This is important, even if you are not so inclined, as it will improve your decision-making ability and restore some vitally lost control over your future outcomes.

How can you help us?

The People Resource is the X-factor in any successful human outcome. CCA Australia needs people of Character, Talent, and Connection at the centre of our initiative and effort, people who help transition CCA to the next level of reality – A reality and effort that can be measured and accountable in actual lives saved – not dollars raised.

Patients are dying too soon or needlessly from a lack of specific and relevant information at the time of diagnosis. It is our intention to change this “lack” and ensure every frontline medical provider delivers a CCA-Specific intro Kit to the Newly Diagnosed patient at the point of diagnosis no later


What is CCA Australia?

A centralised Cholangiocarcinoma Community and knowledge Hub by the Patients and Caregivers for the Patients and Caregivers.

What do we do?

As a patient-up initiative, CCA Australia’s “First-line” effort is to Educate, Equip and Empower the Patient and Caregiver with highly Targeted & Current CCA Information.

How do we do this/help you?
  1. CCA Australia is built around a “Road Map to Best Outcomes” model.
  2. CCA-specific “Intro” & “Patient Toolkit” is central to the Road Map Model
  3. We connect you with your specific peer groups and other relevant connections.
  4. We centralise, simplify and distill the collective knowledge, information & wisdom of successful Patients and Caregivers that have been before you.
  5. Deliver “Todays” most current breakthrough information “Today”
  6. Continue to find new initiatives that improve Patient Empowerment through awareness and implementation of what is learned.
Our biggest focus
  1. Ensure all Newly Diagnosed Patients and their Caregivers receive a CCA Australia Patient Intro Kit at the point of diagnosis no later
  2. There are many breakthrough medical events occurring but information channels to the Newly Diagnosed Patient remain clogged and disenfranchised. We are focused on providing a resourceful information conduit that delivers ‘Todays’ breakthroughs ‘Today’ which in itself will increase much-improved patient outcomes.
Key milestone achievements to date
  1. CCA specific digital Intro Kit 
  2. CCA Specific digital Patient Toolkit
  3. Physical Intro Kit & Patient Toolkit Notebooks are now in design mode.
  4. Centralised Knowledge Resource
  5. Australian and Globally Connected CCA Community
  6. Framework for “Cholangiocarcinoma Foundation Australia
  7. Patient Mentoring (AU, NZ & Global)
CCA Australia is Globally Connected

Key connections/Associations
See all CCA Global Connections on home page 

  1. Cholangiocarcinoma Foundation (USA)
  2. CCF 2021 Sub Steering  Committee
  3. CCF Conference Salt Lake City
  4. CCA NZ
  5. AMMF UK
Please orientate yourself with the “Intro Kit” before proceeding.
Patient Intro Kit

Videos created by Cholangiocarcinoma.org

For Patients
For Health Providers
For other Cancer types

Many new tests and treatments are constantly in development, but many are not yet available to the public or not offered as a “First-line” treatment option. These new tests and treatments are often offered to patients within a strict controlled clinical trial study.

Clinical trials offer patients the opportunity to become involved in treatments that may well become tomorrow’s standard of care. It is important that your Oncologists are conversant/aware of current trial options.

For Cholangiocarcinoma patients in Australia, there are limited Clinical Trial options, but that should not dissuade you from researching all possibilities. Included below are 2 Australian search options, and the Cholangiocarcinoma Foundation (USA) options. We provide this information here to ensure you gain a full overview of the current options regardless of where they originate or are currently located.

Clinical trials will require that you have the biomarkers that align to specific trial requirements hence the importance of obtaining a biopsy (tissue sample of the tumour) and having it tested, in the first instance a simple IHC test (3-5days) and inexpensive and thereafter a full molecular (Genomic) profile.

For Cholangiocarcinoma patients it would be a significant mistake to assume that your surgeon or Oncologist will automatically engage an IHC (Staining test) on your behalf. You will need to ensure or ask that this be completed.

Options + Research
Have we missed your community?

Email: Steve
Ph: +61415153522
FB Messenger

The Globally Connected Patient and Caregiver Community is a Collective of peer-to-peer Knowledge, Experience, and Wisdom. Joining a community of your peers is one of the most significant resources you will have in your toolkit.

Current list of communities
CCA Australia
CCA Support NZ
CCA Awareness NZ
CCF USA
Craine’s Cholangiocarcinoma Crew
CCA Warriors USA
CCA Immuno & Targeted USA
AMMF UK
CCA Support UK & Europe
European Network
Global CCA ALLIANCE UK
The Bili Profect USA
Bile Duct Awareness Group USA
Gallbladder & Bile Duct Support USA
Gallbladder & Bile Duct Awareness USA
Tan Angels 4Ever USA
Intrahepatic Cholangiocarcinoma:

A network of tubes, called ducts, connects the liver, gallbladder, and small intestine. This network begins in the liver where many small ducts collect bile (a fluid made by the liver to break down fats during digestion). The small ducts come together to form the right and left hepatic ducts, which lead out of the liver. The two ducts join outside the liver and form the common hepatic duct. The cystic duct connects the gallbladder to the common hepatic duct. Bile from the liver passes through the hepatic ducts, common hepatic duct, and cystic duct and is stored in the gallbladder.

When food is being digested, bile stored in the gallbladder is released and passes through the cystic duct to the common bile duct and into the small intestine.

Bile duct cancer is also called cholangiocarcinoma.

There are two primary types of bile duct cancer:
Intrahepatic Cholangiocarcinoma:

This type of cancer forms in the bile ducts inside the liver. Only a small number of bile duct cancers are intrahepatic. Intrahepatic bile duct cancers are also called intrahepatic cholangiocarcinomas.

CLICK IMAGE TO ENLARGE

Anatomy of the intrahepatic bile ducts.

Intrahepatic bile ducts are a network of small tubes that carry bile inside the liver. The smallest ducts, called ductules, come together to form the right hepatic bile duct and the left hepatic bile duct, which drain bile from the liver. Bile is stored in the gallbladder and is released when food is being digested.

Source Info

Extrahepatic Cholangiocarcinoma:

This type of cancer forms in the bile ducts outside the liver. The extrahepatic bile duct is made up of the hilum region and the distal region. Cancer can form in either region:

Perihilar:

This type of cancer is found in the hilum region, the area where the right and left bile ducts exit the liver and join to form the common hepatic duct. Perihilar bile duct cancer is also called a Klatskin tumor or perihilar cholangiocarcinoma.

Distal:

This type of cancer is found in the distal region. The distal region is made up of the common bile duct which passes through the pancreas and ends in the small intestine. Distal bile duct cancer is also called extrahepatic cholangiocarcinoma.

CLICK TO ENLARGE IMAGE

Anatomy of the extrahepatic bile ducts.

Extrahepatic bile ducts are small tubes that carry bile outside of the liver. They are made up of the common hepatic duct (hilum region) and the common bile duct (distal region). Bile is made in the liver and flows through the common hepatic duct and the cystic duct to the gallbladder, where it is stored. Bile is released from the gallbladder when food is being digested.

Source info

General Symptoms
Symptoms vary from patient to patient and relate to the stage that the patient is diagnosed.

  • Chills
  • Clay-colored stools
  • Dark urine
  • Fever
  • Itching (pruritus)
  • Loss of appetite
  • Nausea
  • Pain in the upper right abdomen that may radiate to the back
  • Weight Loss
  • Yellowing of the skin (jaundice)
Stages of Cholangiocarcinoma

KEY POINTS

  • The results of diagnostic and staging tests are used to find out if cancer cells have spread.
  • There are three ways that cancer spreads in the body.
  • Cancer may spread from where it began to other parts of the body.
  • Stages are used to describe the different types of bile duct cancer.
  • Intrahepatic Cholangiocarcinoma
  • Perihilar Cholangiocarcinoma
  • Distal Cholangiocarcinoma

The following groups are used to plan treatment:

  • Resectable (localised) bile duct cancer
  • Unresectable (including metastatic and recurrent) bile duct cancer
Stages are used to describe the different types of Cholangiocarcinoma
Intrahepatic Cholangiocarcinoma

Stage 0: In stage 0 intrahepatic bile duct cancer, abnormal cells are found in the innermost layer of tissue lining the intrahepatic bile duct. These abnormal cells may become cancer and spread into nearby normal tissue. Stage 0 is also called carcinoma in situ.

Stage I: Stage I intrahepatic bile duct cancer is divided into stages IA and IB.

CLICK IMAGE TO ENLARGE

Tumor sizes are often measured in centimeters (cm) or inches. Common food items that can be used to show tumor size in cm include: a pea (1 cm), a peanut (2 cm), a grape (3 cm), a walnut (4 cm), a lime (5 cm or 2 inches), an egg (6 cm), a peach (7 cm), and a grapefruit (10 cm or 4 inches).

  • In stage IA, cancer has formed in an intrahepatic bile duct and the tumor is 5 centimeters or smaller.
  • In stage IB, cancer has formed in an intrahepatic bile duct and the tumor is larger than 5 centimeters.

Stage II: In stage II intrahepatic bile duct cancer, either of the following is found:

  • the tumor has spread through the wall of an intrahepatic bile duct and into a blood vessel; or
  • more than one tumor has formed in the intrahepatic bile duct and may have spread into a blood vessel.

Stage III: Stage III intrahepatic bile duct cancer is divided into stages IIIA and IIIB.

  • In stage IIIA, the tumor has spread through the capsule (outer lining) of the liver.
  • In stage IIIB, cancer has spread to organs or tissues near the liver, such as the duodenum, colon, stomach, common bile duct, abdominal wall, diaphragm, or the part of the vena cava behind the liver, or the cancer has spread to nearby lymph nodes.

Stage IV: In stage IV intrahepatic bile duct cancer, cancer has spread to other parts of the body, such as the bone, lungs, distant lymph nodes, or tissue lining the wall of the abdomen and most organs in the abdomen.

Perihilar bile duct cancer

Stage 0: In stage 0 perihilar bile duct cancer, abnormal cells are found in the innermost layer of tissue lining the perihilar bile duct. These abnormal cells may become cancer and spread into nearby normal tissue. Stage 0 is also called carcinoma in situ or high-grade dysplasia.

Stage I: In stage I perihilar bile duct cancer, cancer has formed in the innermost layer of tissue lining the perihilar bile duct and has spread into the muscle layer or fibrous tissue layer of the perihilar bile duct wall.

Stage II: In stage II perihilar bile duct cancer, cancer has spread through the wall of the perihilar bile duct to nearby fatty tissue or to liver tissue.

Stage III: Stage III perihilar bile duct cancer is divided into stages IIIA, IIIB, and IIIC.

  • Stage IIIA: cancer has spread to branches on one side of the hepatic artery or of the portal vein.
  • Stage IIIB: cancer has spread to one or more of the following:
    – the main part of the portal vein or its branches on both sides;
    – the common hepatic artery;
    – the right hepatic duct and the left branch of the hepatic artery or of the portal vein;
    – the left hepatic duct and the right branch of the hepatic artery or of the portal vein.
  • Stage IIIC: cancer has spread to 1 to 3 nearby lymph nodes.

Stage IV: Stage IV perihilar bile duct cancer is divided into stages IVA and IVB.

  • Stage IVA: Cancer has spread to 4 or more nearby lymph nodes.
  • Stage IVB: Cancer has spread to other parts of the body, such as the liver, lung, bone, brain, skin, distant lymph nodes, or tissue lining the wall of the abdomen and most organs in the abdomen.
Distal bile duct cancer

Stage 0: In stage 0 distal bile duct cancer, abnormal cells are found in the innermost layer of tissue lining the distal bile duct. These abnormal cells may become cancer and spread into nearby normal tissue. Stage 0 is also called carcinoma in situ or high-grade dysplasia.

Millimeters (mm). A sharp pencil point is about 1 mm, a new crayon point is about 2 mm, and a new pencil eraser is about 5 mm.

Stage I: In stage I distal bile duct cancer, cancer has formed and spread fewer than 5 millimeters into the wall of the distal bile duct.

Stage II: Stage II distal bile duct cancer is divided into stages IIA and IIB. 

  • Stage IIA: Cancer has spread:
    – fewer than 5 millimeters into the wall of the distal bile duct and has spread to 1 to 3 nearby lymph nodes; or
    – 5 to 12 millimeters into the wall of the distal bile duct.
  • Stage IIB: Cancer has spread 5 millimeters or more into the wall of the distal bile duct. Cancer may have spread to 1 to 3 nearby lymph nodes.

Stage III: Stage III distal bile duct cancer is divided into stages IIIA and IIIB.

  • Stage IIIA: Cancer has spread into the wall of the distal bile duct and to 4 or more nearby lymph nodes.
  • Stage IIIB: Cancer has spread to the large vessels that carry blood to the organs in the abdomen. Cancer may have spread to 1 or more nearby lymph nodes.

Stage IV: In stage IV distal bile duct cancer, cancer has spread to other parts of the body, such as the liver, lungs, or tissue lining the wall of the abdomen and most organs in the abdomen.

KEY POINTS
Please note: This information is derived from the USA National Cancer Center and should be used as a guideline only

  • There are different types of treatment for patients with bile duct cancer.
  • Three types of standard treatment are used:
    – Surgery
    – Radiation therapy
    – Chemotherapy
  • New types of treatment are being tested in clinical trials.
    – Liver transplant
    – Targeted therapy
    – Immunotherapy
  • Treatment for bile duct cancer may cause side effects.
  • Patients may want to think about taking part in a clinical trial.
  • Patients can enter clinical trials before, during, or after starting their cancer treatment.
  • Follow-up tests may be needed.
Side-effects of treatment

Side effects vary greatly and will depend on the specific type of treatment you are receiving. Treating physicians and clinical trials will discuss this before you proceed.

There are different types of treatment for patients with Cholangiocarcinoma

Different types of treatments are available for patients with bile duct cancer. Some treatments are standard (the currently used treatment), and some are being tested in clinical trials. A treatment clinical trial is a research study meant to help improve current treatments or obtain information on new treatments for patients with cancer. When clinical trials show that a new treatment is better than the standard treatment, the new treatment may become the standard treatment. Patients may want to think about taking part in a clinical trial. Some clinical trials are open only to patients who have not started treatment.

Three types of standard treatment are used:
Surgery

The following types of surgery are used to treat bile duct cancer:

  • Removal of the bile duct: A surgical procedure to remove part of the bile duct if the tumor is small and in the bile duct only. Lymph nodes are removed and tissue from the lymph nodes is viewed under a microscope to see if there is cancer.
  • Partial hepatectomy: A surgical procedure in which the part of the liver where cancer is found is removed. The part removed maybe a wedge of tissue, an entire lobe, or a larger part of the liver, along with some normal tissue around it.
  • Whipple procedure: A surgical procedure in which the head of the pancreas, the gallbladder, part of the stomach, part of the small intestine, and the bile duct are removed. Enough of the pancreas is left to make digestive juices and insulin.
Radiation therapy

Radiation therapy is a cancer treatment that uses high-energy x-rays or other types of radiation to kill cancer cells or keep them from growing. There are two types of radiation therapy:

  • External radiation therapy uses a machine outside the body to send radiation toward the area of the body with cancer.
  • Internal radiation therapy uses a radioactive substance sealed in needles, seeds, wires, or catheters that are placed directly into or near the cancer.

External and internal radiation therapy is used to treat bile duct cancer.

It is not yet known whether external radiation therapy helps in the treatment of resectable bile duct cancer. In unresectable, metastatic, or recurrent bile duct cancer, new ways to improve the effect of external radiation therapy on cancer cells are being studied:

  • Hyperthermia therapy: A treatment in which body tissue is exposed to high temperatures to make cancer cells more sensitive to the effects of radiation therapy and certain anticancer drugs.
  • Radiosensitizers: Drugs that make cancer cells more sensitive to radiation therapy. Combining radiation therapy with radiosensitizers may kill more cancer cells.
Chemotherapy

Chemotherapy is a cancer treatment that uses drugs to stop the growth of cancer cells, either by killing the cells or by stopping them from dividing. When chemotherapy is taken by mouth or injected into a vein or muscle, the drugs enter the bloodstream and can reach cancer cells throughout the body (systemic chemotherapy). When chemotherapy is placed directly into the cerebrospinal fluid, an organ, or a body cavity such as the abdomen, the drugs mainly affect cancer cells in those areas (regional chemotherapy).

Systemic chemotherapy is used to treat unresectable, metastatic, or recurrent bile duct cancer. It is not yet known whether systemic chemotherapy helps in the treatment of resectable bile duct cancer.

In unresectable, metastatic, or recurrent bile duct cancer, intra-arterial embolization is being studied. It is a procedure in which the blood supply to a tumor is blocked after anticancer drugs are given in blood vessels near the tumor. Sometimes, the anticancer drugs are attached to small beads that are injected into an artery that feeds the tumor. The beads block blood flow to the tumor as they release the drug. This allows a higher amount of drug to reach the tumor for a longer period of time, which may kill more cancer cells.

New types of treatment are being tested in clinical trials.

This summary section describes treatments that are being studied in clinical trials. It may not mention every new treatment being studied. Information about clinical trials is available from the NCI website. This is USA specific – but will give you an overview

Liver transplant
In a liver transplant, the entire liver is removed and replaced with a healthy donated liver. A liver transplant may be done in patients with perihilar bile duct cancer. If the patient has to wait for a donated liver, other treatment is given as needed.

Targeted therapy

Targeted therapy is a type of treatment that uses drugs or other substances to identify and attack specific cancer cells. Targeted therapies usually cause less harm to normal cells than chemotherapy or radiation therapy do. The following targeted therapies are being studied in patients with bile duct cancer that is locally advanced and cannot be removed by surgery or has spread to other parts of the body:

  • Ivosidenib is a type of targeted therapy that blocks a specific mutation in a gene called IDH1. It works by slowing or stopping the growth of cancer cells.
  • Pemigatinib and infigratinib are types of targeted therapies that block specific changes in a gene called FGFR2. This may help keep cancer cells from growing and may kill them.
Immunotherapy

Immunotherapy is a treatment that uses the patient’s immune system to fight cancer. Substances made by the body or made in a laboratory are used to boost, direct, or restore the body’s natural defenses against cancer. This cancer treatment is a type of biologic therapy.

Immune checkpoint inhibitor therapy is a type of immunotherapy that may be used to treat bile duct cancer.

  • PD-1 and PD-L1 inhibitor therapy: PD-1 is a protein on the surface of T cells that helps keep the body’s immune responses in check. PD-L1 is a protein found on some types of cancer cells. When PD-1 attaches to PD-L1, it stops the T cell from killing the cancer cell. PD-1 and PD-L1 inhibitors keep PD-1 and PD-L1 proteins from attaching to each other. This allows the T cells to kill cancer cells. Pembrolizumab is a type of PD-1 inhibitor that may be used in patients whose cancer is locally advanced and cannot be removed by surgery or has spread to other parts of the body.

Immune checkpoint inhibitor. Checkpoint proteins, such as PD-L1 on tumor cells and PD-1 on T cells, help keep immune responses in check. The binding of PD-L1 to PD-1 keeps T cells from killing tumor cells in the body (left panel). Blocking the binding of PD-L1 to PD-1 with an immune checkpoint inhibitor (anti-PD-L1 or anti-PD-1) allows the T cells to kill tumor cells (right panel).

Immunotherapy uses the body’s immune system to fight cancer. This animation explains one type of immunotherapy that uses immune checkpoint inhibitors to treat cancer.

Treatment for bile duct cancer may cause side effects.

For information about side effects caused by treatment for cancer, see Side Effects page. (USA)

You may want to think about taking part in a clinical trial.

For some patients, taking part in a clinical trial may be the best treatment choice. Clinical trials are part of the cancer research process. Clinical trials are done to find out if new cancer treatments are safe and effective or better than the standard treatment.

Many of today’s standard treatments for cancer are based on earlier clinical trials. Patients who take part in a clinical trial may receive the standard treatment or be among the first to receive a new treatment.

Patients who take part in clinical trials also help improve the way cancer will be treated in the future. Even when clinical trials do not lead to effective new treatments, they often answer important questions and help move research forward.

You can enter clinical trials before, during, or after starting their cancer treatment.

This is USA content but it is accurate and will provide an overview
Some clinical trials only include patients who have not yet received treatment. Other trials test treatments for patients whose cancer has not gotten better. There are also clinical trials that test new ways to stop cancer from recurring (coming back) or reduce the side effects of cancer treatment.

Clinical trials are taking place in many parts of the country. Information about clinical trials supported by NCI can be found on NCI’s clinical trials search webpage. Clinical trials supported by other organizations can be found on the ClinicalTrials.gov website.

Follow-up tests may be needed.

Some of the tests that were done to diagnose the cancer or to find out the stage of the cancer may be repeated. Some tests will be repeated in order to see how well the treatment is working. Decisions about whether to continue, change, or stop treatment may be based on the results of these tests.

Some of the tests will continue to be done from time to time after treatment has ended. The results of these tests can show if your condition has changed or if the cancer has recurred (come back). These tests are sometimes called follow-up tests or check-ups.

Treatment of Resectable (Localized) Bile Duct Cancer

For information about the treatments listed below, see the Treatment Option Overview section.

Treatment of resectable intrahepatic bile duct cancer may include:

  • Surgery to remove the cancer, which may include partial hepatectomy. Embolization may be done before surgery.

Treatment of resectable perihilar bile duct cancer many include:

  • Surgery to remove the cancer, which may include partial hepatectomy.
  • Stent placement or percutaneous transhepatic biliary drainage as palliative therapy, to relieve jaundice and other symptoms and improve the quality of life.

Treatment of resectable distal bile duct cancer may include:

  • Surgery to remove the cancer, which may include a Whipple procedure.
  • Stent placement or percutaneous transhepatic biliary drainage as palliative therapy, to relieve jaundice and other symptoms and improve the quality of life.

Adjuvant therapy for resectable bile duct cancer may include:

  • Chemotherapy.
  • External-beam radiation therapy.
  • A clinical trial of adjuvant therapy.

Use the (USA) clinical trial search to find NCI-supported cancer clinical trials that are accepting patients. You can search for trials based on the type of cancer, the age of the patient, and where the trials are being done. General information about clinical trials is also available.

Treatment of Unresectable Bile Duct Cancer (Including Metastatic or Recurrent Disease)

For information about the treatments listed below, see the Treatment Option Overview section.

Treatment of unresectable bile duct cancer (including metastatic or recurrent disease) may include:

  • Stent placement or biliary bypass as palliative treatment to relieve symptoms and improve the quality of life.
  • External or internal radiation therapy as palliative treatment to relieve symptoms and improve the quality of life.
  • Combination chemotherapy.
  • A clinical trial of various combinations of chemotherapy.
  • A clinical trial of immunotherapy in patients with mutations (changes) in certain genes.
  • A clinical trial of targeted therapy in patients with mutations (changes) in certain genes.

Use our clinical trial search to find NCI-supported cancer clinical trials that are accepting patients. You can search for trials based on the type of cancer, the age of the patient, and where the trials are being done. General information about clinical trials is also available.

Original Source

Many cancer deaths are caused when cancer moves from the original tumor and spreads to other tissues and organs. This is called metastatic cancer. This animation shows how cancer cells travel from the place in the body where they first formed to other parts of the body.

The results of diagnostic and staging tests are used to find out if cancer cells have spread.

The process used to find out if cancer has spread to other parts of the body is called staging. For bile duct cancer, the information gathered from tests and procedures is used to plan treatment, including whether the tumor can be removed by surgery.

There are three ways that cancer spreads in the body.

Cancer can spread through tissue, the lymph system, and the blood:

  • Tissue. Cancer spreads from where it began by growing into nearby areas.
  • Lymph system. Cancer spreads from where it began by getting into the lymph system. Cancer travels through the lymph vessels to other parts of the body.
  • Blood. The cancer spreads from where it began by getting into the blood. The cancer travels through the blood vessels to other parts of the body.
Cancer may spread from where it began to other parts of the body.

When cancer spreads to another part of the body, it is called metastasis. Cancer cells break away from where they began (the primary tumor) and travel through the lymph system or blood.

  • Lymph system. Cancer gets into the lymph system, travels through the lymph vessels, and forms a tumor (metastatic tumor) in another part of the body.
  • Blood. Cancer gets into the blood, travels through the blood vessels, and forms a tumor (metastatic tumor) in another part of the body.

The metastatic tumor is the same type of cancer as the primary tumor. For example, if bile duct cancer spreads to the liver, the cancer cells in the liver are actually bile duct cancer cells. The disease is metastatic bile duct cancer, not liver cancer.

We Need Caregiver & Patient Mentors

Could you help? if so call Steve +61 415 153 522

Australia/NZ Mentors and Advocates

We are available to help where we can. Connecting, Sharing, and Asking Questions is a very healthy start.

We have begun building a register of CCA recommended Surgeons and Oncologists

This list is generated by Patient & Caregiver recommendations.

We have a survey running on our Facebook group to collect this information. The list will hopefully be available in early 2022.

For Newly Diagnosed Patients needing information on an immediate basis please ask for recommendations on our group chat /groups/cholangiocarcinomaaustralasia

Regards Steve
+61415153522
steve@cholangiocarcinoma.com.au

NED (No Evidence of Disease) | Complete Remission

Is this you? Please share your story
steve@cholangiocarcinoma.com.au

Patients that had
Chemotherapy + Surgery + Immunotherapy and now ‘NED’
Patients that had
Chemotherapy + Immunotherapy only (ie no surgery) and now ‘NED’
Patients that had
Surgery + Chemotherapy and now ‘NED’
Patients that had a
Liver Transplant with or without Chemotherapy and now ‘NED’
Other Success Stories

View Cholangiocarcinoma Foundation (USA) Success stories

Is this you? please contact Steve 

“To walk on water you must first believe it is possible, despite everyone else knowing that it is not!
Anything and everything is possible if you remain open to its reality. It allowed my willingness to rise up like a bright beacon so that ‘opportunity’ & ‘good fortune’ could always find their way to me. There have been times when this is all I had left in the tank.” Steve Holmes (Patient)